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share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina o
about a week-long event and actually constructed a building and this also helps us it restore capability to wherever we are responding to. this shows a lot of different response here. this is our urban search and rescue event that was part of the overall exercise. we had a lot of different partners that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise the
-day humanitarian assistance disaster relief. we used it as an accreditation not only for some of our adaptive force packages, but more importantly to the state of hawaii to allow them to get an accreditation that they needed for 13 of their hospitals where we set up on ford island, those familiar with the oahu island geography, we utilized ford island and we had a scenario where there was an earthquake with a resultant tsunami and mass casualties along with the destruction that goes with it to the road infrastructure and communication. and, so, we were able to parlay, if you will, this opportunity to leverage off our international partners. we had seven nations that out of the 22 that actually participated in the hadr, and there were probably also 19 of the 22 that at least observed. but there were 7 of us that actually participated. and we were able to share with each other those things that worked, those things that don't work. it's interesting because one of the things that we work very hard on was one of the things that the first panel this morning talked about, and that was communication. and
, it was a little bit different for us as far as what happened there. like cal fire wants to, just like we all do, is aggressively attack things. but we have the applicable policies and orders that really regulate us a little bit because it's got to meet certain thresholds and sometimes like in this last one, it was a remote fire, very small, but it didn't meet some of the thresholds initially but we postured and as soon as it crossed the line they were ready to attack it aggressively. those are challenges we have to work with as well but we're ready to provide that immediate response when necessary. >> we talked a little bit so far about training exercises but maybe from the navy perspective, the marine perspective, the national guard, what training exercises are you doing right now to integrate with cal fire or other local governments to make sure that we're ready for this fire season? >> well, as far as i expressed earlier, we have the springtime exercise. that was our fifth annual one. we will obviously continue that through. just like we were speaking about yesterday, maturing the proces
study if jtap would be feasible for us to use and if it is, it would be fantastic. our concern is if it's only used during a sdas ster and it's not used on a daily basis, are you going to have to spend a lot of time training? it's not really hard to use but there are some complexities with it. so it is a big job in the city tracking patient movement and we are addressing it. and i think we're waiting for the feasibility study to kind of determine what our next step would be. >> i think there was another question here. yes. >> yes, we know from hsda studies that for a very large earthquake you can expect perhaps tens of thousands of individuals that will need hospital treatment and hospitals are generally fairly full anyway. was there any discussion of altered standards of care during your workshops? >> not during the workshop specifically but it is something we've discussed at our hospital council group on and off and it is something the counseling association of hospitals is working on as well. i think we have to think as a group locally what type of policy we would want to have. i
association in conjunction with commander, u.s. navy third athlete, gerald beman and the united states marine corps major general spie s. the association is comprised of 12 board of directors, all of whom are volunteers. the chairman, major general michael myatt. united states marine corps retired. jod jodie breakenridge, retired. senator finestein and george schulz. the san francisco fleet week board of directors are planning fleet week year round and many city and counties are beginning their own programs to do what san francisco has done with their unprecedented efforts toward humanitarian assistance and training. today we have a world-class lineup for the entire bay area. we have a spectacular venue at the marina green showcasing the marina green. the physical symbol of commitment of federal, state and local agencies to the emergency preparedness of the bay area in a time of crisis. in that wasn't enough, after the parade of ships this morning, the navy's premiere flight demonstration, the blue angels will perform their most daring maneuvering over, under and around the golden gate bridge
and gentlemen, the fire boat phoenix. long may she serve san francisco. next is line is the u.s. navy guided missile destroyer, the u.s.s. rebel. equipped with the aegis combat system. it was commissioned in 2002 and deployed last year from san diego as part of the ronald reagan strike group. it was one of first ships to provide humanitarian assistance following the earthquake and tsunami in japan. the first responder, the rebel embarked navy helicopters surveyed the coast line to provide an aerial perspective for the damage to other ships for relief efforts. after hearing first hand from survivors, the crew volunteered to provide assistance. during deployment also conducted counter piracy patrol to enforce exclusive zones in the region. should ship's names sake, edward rebel served in the revolutionary war and searched in a bold complain against pirates and helped shape the fighting spirit that has been characteristic of the u.s. navy. the u.s.s. rebel is the sixth ship to bare the next time. there's 9217 tons and can sail in excess of 30 knots. there's 30 officers and 270 enlisted personne
happy that all of you could come out and join us, you know, on this evening. my namey. the director of the night rover challenge. i'm going to kind of be the moderator for tonight, as we go through this first-ever challenge america summit. so i've got just a few things that, you know, i wanted to do with everyone, before we get into the program. first of all, i just want to take a minute and have everyone just look around this room. in this room, we have amazing people that are corporate, nonprofit, and government, all focused on challenge driven innovation in some way or another. this is a really powerful,interf people that are gathered here to look at how competitions can drive innovation. that's what tonight is all about, is, you know, the next step in creating a real wave of innovation. my job tonight is just to give you a little bit of background on what we are, what we're tiqp)q)s that we have.roup of so just to get going with that, i want to tell you a little bit about this thing called the night rover/< challenge. this is a collaboration between the clean tech open, unoodle,
. although we're transient in nature, sometimes we're in deployment, many of us are home owners and we live in that community. we are part of that community as well. just like the guard, we have an interest in protecting our friends and neighbors. sustainment is, it's important to us and we'll maintain it especially on the region side. we're able to have these long-standing relationships while the operating force side goes forward and supports the on-going efforts, we are able to stay back here and sustain those relationships. >> just to follow on that, the navy squadrons that provide fire fighting capability are a combination of active and reserve components. one benefit of reserve components is more longevity is pilots in the squadrons. you may have people who have been there for 6, 7 years and have seen multiple fires. that mutual trust is absolutely essential to this capability. >> a couple things that come it mind real briefly, we're talking about wild and land fires primarily but rest assured amongst the group here we're always thinking in an all rest capacity. cal fire's missio
found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, n
and the resources that we would have available to us in the event of a large-scale emergency. my hat is off to all of you with just how well you've planned, your multitude capabilities, and as secretary schultz said i'll take a note from his confidence of display. to see how you set up in an hour a field hospital to take care of patients, not run of the mill patients, but critically wounded patients. we were so impressed. i think a couple other words the secretary used were impressive and reassuring. that's what it's about, forming partnerships. so, i'm very proud to be not only to be honoring and celebrating our military, but to be partnering once again in cross training. happy to report that a little later today aboard the uss macon, we're learning the best. firefighting below the deck, members on the flight deck learning about aircraft rescue, firefighting. similarly, and i won't be able to stay the whole day today because soon i'll be headed over to treasure island, a former navy firefighting school, we'll have that facility about 14 years and we'll be welcoming 40 members from the u.s. marine
. the engine that was used and seen in the movie, "titanic". she travels 10 knots. the obrian was named in the national defense in our own sasoon bay. in the 1970's, the idea of preserving the ship began to develop and the ship was put aside for preservation instead of being sold or scrapped. in the mid- 1978's, the memorial was formed to restore the obrian and the first of thousands of hours of work to resurrect the ship from her preserved limbo. she was the last ship in the moth ball fleet. after months of preparation including the cleaning and testing of machinery and systems, the ship left the fleet, the only vessel to do so of her own power. please rises and salute the u.s.s. jeremiah o'brien. thank you. >> the ship then moved to fort mason from the san francisco waterfront to the west of fisherman's wharf. she became dedicated to the ships by the merchant marines. she began her second tour around the san francisco bay. she resumes her duties in san francisco and moving to her final place in fisherman's wharf. she has ventured to the pacific northwest in 1996 and more recently, to
and applying them to real processes where we have interchange and response. 18 months of planning allowed us certain benefits as well. we were able to look at the capabilities that each other brought to the table in these type of environments and we were able to really take those and learn more about each other for future responses. we were able to take and provide a taylored response package to better serve the customer. again, we don't want to go in with a full package that the state or civil environments aren't really asking for, we want to be sure it's taylored appropriately and it's responsive and timely. we also had the humanitarian assistance coordination center. that's the place we were able to take the non-governmental agencies and the hoetion nation international agencies and have them interacting and coordinating with the military folks so that we were able to provide an understanding of how we all work together. so if you want additional information, if you want to talk to captain napalitano, he is the commanding officer for the expeditionary training group, and he is the -- i
. for us today, showing that recreating that path way if you will, it's a huge complement to the city for the way that you have always embraced our returning sailors, marines and coast guardsman that served forward and are finally coming home again. the parade of ships is a visible display of a partnership between the bay area and the sea services that has been strengthened. just this week, we brought together military leaders, local and state leaders and industry to discuss something that is important to all of us. when the next natural disaster or crisis takes place on our home ground, assembling the team that's going to take care of that has been a wonderful thing. we can't imagine where we would be had we not conducted these senior leadership conferences the last couple years. building partnerships is something we consider important to our nation and the service in particular. as i mentioned last evening, just this last summer, we conducted the world's largest maritime exercise. rim of the pacific and the state of hawaii in their operating areas. it brought together 22 nations to
then became our secretary of defense. and many of us that have served thought that he was one of the best secretary of defenses we've ever had. he's currently a senior fellow at the hoover institute and a freeman foley institute of international studies. he is the michael and barbara bavarian professor at stanford university and serves as co-director of the nuclear risk reduction initiative and preventive defense project. please help me welcome our speaker this morning, former secretary of defense william perry. (applause) >> what a pleasure it is to be aboard this symbol of america's millery power, the uss macon island. what a pleasure it is to be among the men and women of our armed forces and the men and women of the first responders of the san francisco bay area. fleet week for many years in san francisco was a somewhat [inaudible] affair and it has been transformed into this great coming together by the military and the first responders, the great coming together of our uniformed personnel and a great [speaker not understood] of san francisco. this amazing transformation in the last
the establishment of the dual status commander helps us pull title 10 and title 32 forces together in a more synchronized dod response. the new attention and focus by dod is only part of the puzzle, though. dod success in helping in response to a disaster will ultimately be determined by civil authorities and their ability to properly plan their initial response and then the means by which dod capabilities are requested and properly employed. we know dod is in support of civil authorities and the real burden to that effective support is going to be sound planning to ensure we're properly directed and we can best benefit or provide benefit to the need of the place where we're supporting. the guidance now being given will drive training and exercises. and recognition of our effectiveness at providing relief for our fellow citizens does require preparation. vice admiral beeman spoke emphatickly of readiness yesterday. readiness is no accident but is a deliberate outcome of focus and hard work. dod is now stepping up to the plate in a very formal and direct way but this will only w
it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so we can certainly hit the ground running, but then we would need some sort shortly thereafter. >> mine is a two-part question. we've seen in ismat turkey in 1999 a number of walking wounded that will immediately overwhelm the medical response community and then how do you disallow them immediate health care and the specter of reality tv, so that would be the first part, managing expectation in our gold standard health care system. the other part of that response, to maximize the saving of lives, they actually severed limbs in the response process to maximize the safing lives. have we talked about indemnify case of our medical response teams post response? ?oo ?a we did not actually discuss indemnify case or any other legal or even ethical issues on a broader kail. all the hospitals do have plans to handle a surge of patients including a very large number of walking wounded. we assume they will arrive at the hospital starting immediately, even sometimes before t
seized the panamanian freighter and confiscated the largest drug seizure in history. in 1977, the u.s. adopted the 200 mile exclusive economic zone in response to growing concern over marine region. especially off the vast coast line of the north pacific and the berring see. in may of 1979, cutter sherman was transferred to alameda, california. including fishery, law enforcement, drug interactions. sherman and her sister were the only regular u.s. armed forces. >> in may of 1986, sherman was delivered to the shipiard for renovatio renovatio shipyard for renovations. [inaudible] >> after completing the trial period of this project, sheave recommissioned as part of new generation fully operational marine vessels as the coast guard celebrated 200 years of service. in july 2001. sherman assisted with the u.s. sanctions in the persian gulf and supported good will in south africa and madagascar and received a medal for the interdiction of a panamanian vessel carrying 20 tons of corn where a street value of $600 million. in may of 2011. sherman was transferred to her current home in san dieg
humanitarian exchange. it's been a wonderful way for us to work together on some of these common issues and figure out how our agencies are all going to integrate. i think the time and effort that has been expended by both the military planners and also the civilian planners is definitely going to be bearing fruit in years to come when something happens. i know we are quite a bit ahead of time, you are going to have a 20-minute break from now and then our next speaker will come up at that point. thank you again. he heads the baur row of medicine for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure here and i'm honored to b
have good situational awareness what's going on in the state of california. they normally put us in an alert stat us so we're prepared to respond in an attack mode. i don't often work with chief chaney in southern california, about a month ago we had 9 aircraft at our peak working fires throughout northern california if that answers your question. >> any other responses? >> i wanted to touch -- can you hear me now? i wanted to touch on that last topic as far as the command control because what we have here in the marine corps is similar to the navy. we have the installation, the regional installation command and also partners with the operational foresite. we allow the operational foresight, we maintain those but then we coordinate, cooperate, with the operational foresight once the call comes in for support. so we're able to do that obviously through memorandum of understandings and we have agreements and our wing operating orders allow for the fact the operational control, at least under operational response, maintains with the operators. the third aircraft wing maintains
how that would apply if we're using those folks in a humanitarian disaster in california. we're able to treat our folks regardless of the state of licensing in a particular state, though. >> last year when i took a look at the shock trauma platoon, and i'm going to talk to you about that one really cool thing i saw. i have a little bit of medical experience and to see they have effectively a robotic soldier that can go into defib, whose eyes can dilate, they can do pulses both radial and distal and there is a programmer who is effectively testing a battlefield soldier what to do, i found absolutely fascinating as a way to bring a real life experience to that individual. for me that was a fantastic tool that you have and i thought that was wonderful. >> we're going to be -- little advertisement -- we're going to be demonstrating that capability at our display at the marina green so if you'd like to come see that, that's available. >> any final questions? i'd like to thank our panelists very much. as rob mentioned earlier, the exercise series we have put on and started 3 years ago h
and local governments and his focus, his direction to us really comes down it 3 things. he asks us to always plan for the worst case, the maximum of the maximums and it's go to see the department of defense is incorporating this within the catastrophe policy that was spoken about a little earlier. no. 2, he asked us to sppbld and are able to stabilize an incident within 72 hours. his mantra is think big, go big, go fast but not fast. 3, he asks us to do this within a whole community approach, not only it make sure we utilize the whole community in the response because there's much more responders past the federal-state responders. there's the public being responders and there's many others, private industry need to be in that so we try to integrate that into a whole community concept. and also to make sure when we respond we respond to take into account the whole community. not everybody looks like me and you but we need to be able to take into account and service our elderly, infants and others that may need special assistance. with that, the purpose of this working lunch is to present vie
charlie. the previous day general hughes had briefed us that the chinese military were to begin extensive military maneuvers in the taiwan strait. this morning we were stunned to learn that they had fired two missiles that landed just 10 miles off the coast of taiwan. the taiwanese had a presidential election underway, and the chinese were using a not too subtle way of explaining to them what they wanted the outcome of that election to be. thises was an unacceptable form of military coercion and both the general and i agreed that a strong response was needed by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the wor
in the event of a complex catastrophe, so that is a little bit different for us. there has been movement within dod and we have grown and matured certainly our presence in the fema regions has expanded, new capabilities have been delivered to the states, and we have developed the much more responsive and functional command structure, i believe, with the dual status commander and that's somebody who can bridge national guard and active or federalized forces as they flow into a disaster response. but more recently the secretary of defense has elevated this and defense support to civil authorities has been dregted -- directed into the departments to start developing plans and policies that will adjust how we respond. so we're seeing a directive that will make things more expensive and specific in defense for civil authorities and this is the most significant move in dsca that i have seen in my career. since late november, 2011, comprehensive planning meetings have taken place to analyze the issues surrounding dsca and have provided a laundry list for recommendations of actions to be taken. the d
term we're using, we're reach a certain draw down level or certain criteria, we reach out to our military coordinators, hence our agreement with the third nraet and the one map locally in san francisco under ir cal fire prides itself on a statistic that we contain 97 percent of all wild fires in california with 10 acres or less and we do this with an aggressive report of incidents, even with a 911 call of smoepk with land, air and ground attack. once fires become to a large enough scale we call mue tour aid, california lass a great mue tour aid system. i think it's looked at nationally because we have souch excellent cooperation with our cooperating agencies. once it reaches that point, the team will come in and assist the local jurisdiction to run that incident. when we start having multiple fires in a certain area, then we get into what we call area command. i think that provides the overview. >> i talked a little bit about mou's and relationships with the marines. maybe we can talk about how is the national guard and dod resources and capabilities integrated into the comm
had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple of you commented, you may be wondering why i have a bandage on my hand and i look like i got into a fight at a bar. i happened to spend a couple hours in one of our city's finest emergency rooms after a minor bike accident. and it is minor, no broken bones, i'm fine. but what is interesting to me in my experience of getting knocked off my bike was that for about an hour or two after the accident, my body was shaking uncontrollably. i was experiencing what i later learned on wikipedia was the phenomenon known as shock. and we know as a community that when the next disaster hits us, not if, but when, our community will go into shock. in fact, we market this in our local efforts as the 72 hours. the 72 hours that hits any community, when we know that disaster responders are still getting together their infrastructure. and what i want all of you to tell us is what are those best practices that you have been studying and you have bee
be a good idea for us to hear about the operations that the chilean navy had undertaken for helping out their citizens. we have a panel here today, we actually have two panels we're going to roll through. one is stories from the field, if you will, people's experiences in working in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in th
believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've known melvin for a number of years, obviously we served together in the marine corps. i can tell you he's been with fleet week for 3 years now and the one thing about mel, he's got a lot of ideas and he accepts no as an interim answer because a lot of things that he wanted to do to make fleet week better originally the answer from authorities was no. and he made some amazing things happen just through his will. a commander can will things to happen. and i really want to thank you, mel, for that whole peer to peer medical exchange was your idea and it was just a huge hit and i thank you so much for that. he's offe
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

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